Monthly Archives: Julho 2015

CoreGenomics: Does survival of the fittest apply to bioinformatics tools?

Sourced through Scoop.it from: core-genomics.blogspot.com

See on Scoop.itBioinformática

Ebola continues to shift, but grows no more fatal

In the West African epidemic, Ebola evolved and spread quickly, but the virus is not becoming deadlier over time.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.sciencenews.org

See on Scoop.itVirology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca

The Genesis Engine

Editing DNA is now cut-and-paste. We could eliminate disease, cure hunger—or break the world.

Source: www.wired.com

A cellular puzzle: The weird and wonderful architecture of RNA

Cells contain an ocean of twisting and turning RNA molecules. Now researchers are working out the structures — and how important they could be.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.nature.com

See on Scoop.itBioinformática

Finding Hidden Messages in DNA (Bioinformatics I) – University of California, San Diego | Coursera

Finding Hidden Messages in DNA (Bioinformatics I) from University of California, San Diego. This course begins a series of classes illustrating the power of computing in modern biology. Please join us on the frontier of bioinformatics to look for hidden messages in DNA without ever needing to put on a lab coat. After warming up our algorithmic muscles, we will learn how randomized algorithms can be used to solve problems in bioinformatics. Take free online classes from 120+ top universities and

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.coursera.org

Um curso engraçado do Coursera suportado pela Universidade da Califórnia (campus de San Diego) sob o título "Encontrando mensagens ocultas no DNA". Engraçado o tema escolhido para o video de apresentação: "A bioinformática tem crescido imenso mas continua a ser um campo inexplorado, ao estilo de um Western americano". Já um professor meu me dizia que a Bioinformática me dizia que a Bioinformática continua a ser um verdadeiro faroeste…

 

See on Scoop.itBioinformática

Why is life left-handed? The answer is in the stars

Researchers have created a star-forming cloud in the laboratory to try to recreate the first-ever biological molecule. The study could explain why such molecules are left-handed.

 

While most humans are right-handed, our proteins are made up of lefty molecules. In the same way your left and right hands mirror one another, molecules can assemble in two reflected structures. Life prefers the left-handed version, which is puzzling since both mirrored types form equally in the laboratory. But a new study suggests that this may be because the star-forming cloud that created the first-ever biological molecule, before our sun was even born, made it left-handed.

In 2004, NASA’s Stardust spacecraft swept through the nebulous halo surrounding a comet. What it found was the simplest of life’s building blocks: the amino acid glycine. Comets are frozen remnants from the earliest days in our solar system. Their material is therefore not made in planets, but likely originates in the natal gas cloud that formed our sun.

A research team recently recreated the freezing conditions inside such a star-forming cloud. In apparatus sealed completely from the already crisp air in the laboratory, the temperature can be brought down to -263 degrees Celsius, just ten degrees above absolute zero where even molecules stop vibrating. They believed that on the surface of dust grains suspended in this chilly gas, glycine may have undergone a change that made it left-handed.

At the core of the glycine molecule is a carbon atom with four bonds. If two of these bonds attach to hydrogen atoms, then the molecule is symmetric and neither right nor left handed. However, swap a hydrogen for a heavier atom and this symmetry is broken. The molecule can then form two mirrored versions, giving it handedness or “chirality” as it is called in chemistry.

The experiments suggest that a glycine hydrogen atom could be displaced by an atom of deuterium, which is a heavier version of hydrogen that contains an extra neutron in its nucleus, doubling its weight. It is abundant inside star-forming clouds, which is why they create many deuterium-enriched compounds, including heavy water. Once a deuterium atom has replaced a hydrogen, it is very hard to dislodge. This means that the fraction of chiral glycine steadily increases, until the main species of glycine inside the cloud shows left or right handedness.

Chiral glycine is very similar to original glycine, but with an important extra property. Laboratory experiments have shown that chiral glycine is a catalyst for other chiral molecules. That is, it promotes the production of other species with the same handedness as itself. The result is that if glycine became a left-handed molecule, then future biological molecules would also be predominantly left-handed. When life developed on Earth, it would therefore build from a pool of left-handed molecules, giving it the bias we observe today.

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: theconversation.com

See on Scoop.itBioinformática

A bird’s eye view of advanced prostate cancer

A tour de force analysis reveals clinically actionable mutations in castration- resistant prostate cancer.

Source: www.fredhutch.org